Friday, March 5, 2010

Today’s ghost town expedition to Sasco, Arizona

















Following an early morning visit to the dentist to replace a filling that fell out ten days ago, I decided to explore a mining ghost town in southern Pinal County known as Sasco. I was out of the dentist chair and on the road before 9:00AM.

I had to pass through part of the Ironwood Forest National Monument. Like many national monuments, I was greeted with the usual “Travel Caution” sign(see previous blogs) warning me of illegal immigration and smuggling. I guess every public recreation area in this state had been invaded by illegal aliens and drug smugglers. Remember to bring your firearm.

The road from Red Rock was impassable because the Santa Cruz River was flowing. I had to go in the back way through Marana. This road is actually smoother and wider than I’m accustomed to. Travel to this site was easy. As is almost always the case, we had the desert all to ourselves.

Ghost Town: Sasco, Arizona

Sasco is a mining ghost town in Pinal County, Arizona west of Red Rock Sasco, which is an acronym for the Southern Arizona Smelter Company, was a company town for the smelter, which served the Silver Bell mines. Sasco's post office was established July 10, 1907 and was discontinued September 15, 1919. At its peak about 600 people lived here. Remaining structures include the impressive shell of the Rockland Hotel, extensive foundations for the smelter, and the old cemetery.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sasco,_Arizona
http://www.ghosttowns.com/states/az/sasco.html

Sasco Ghost Town Haunts

Sasco shows off its history to visitors. While many ghost towns have been transformed into modern day tourist attractions, Sasco retains its ghostly aura in the form of its ruins. Many building foundations still stand in maze-like fashion. Sections of the Hotel Rockland’s walls still stand. Even the towering smelter furnace can still be seen. Many of the walls sport spray paint because the site is frequently a haunt for teens and paintball parties.
http://www.arizona-leisure.com/az-ghost-town-sasco.html

A short drive east to La Osa Ranch Road, then north .6 of a mile to a "Y" in the road, leads to the Sasco Cemetery. Among the memorials are several concrete crosses, reminders of the devastating influenza epidemic of 1918 – 1919 that claimed more than a half-million American victims.
http://www.rozylowicz.com/retirement/sasco/sasco.html

Rejilla Baldinegro, father Francisco Baldinegro born Yuma, AZ, mother Gertrinda Venzuella born Benson, AZ. Rejilla was born in Casa Grande, AZ and died 7 Dec. 1927 on the Juana Aruzo Ranch near Picacho of Tuberculosis. Was buried on 8 Dec 1927 in the Sasco Cemetery, 22 years old at time of death. [Page #196]
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~azpinal/cem_sasco.htm
 
Today’s weather was perfect for an excursion. The temperature was in the low 70’s and there was hardly a cloud in the sky.

Monday, March 1, 2010

03/01/2010, F.O.R. Maricopa Food Bank revisited. . . . And there’s never a dull moment.

















If it wasn’t for the fact that I piled up some 11.000 Total Rewards points on my Harrah’s card during a two month long free promotion last fall , I never would have made this amazing discovery. (I don’t support Indian gaming because it‘s racially biased, so I don’t spend money there.)

I have been visiting Harrah’s Ak Chin Casino in Maricopa over the past few months so I may indulge in free meals at the Harvest Buffet. I have until the end of April to use up my the balance of my Total Rewards points.

As I have walked through the casino towards the buffet, I have either noticed or have run into many people that go to the F.O.R. food bank every single week. How is it that they can afford to gamble in the first place? If they weren’t blowing their money on the slots, perhaps they could afford to buy their own food. I don’t see these people as needy at all. It’s quite clear that these are dishonorable and unrespectable people who cannot control their self destructive habits.

On another occasion, I observed a semi-regular food bank donation recipient, pull up to the valet parking area in a Lincoln super cab pickup. Obviously, there is something wrong here. That truck costs more than my home did and this woman(a Hispanic or Indian female bipedal primate) is going to the food bank to accept donations while still being able to feed a gaming habit on top of paying for valet parking. This is so wrong! On any given Monday, one can see a variety of expensive vehicles parked at F.O.R.

A new computerized system has been introduced at the food bank. People lined up to be entered into the system. They were asked to produce identification and/or a utility bill. Apparently, lots of people who drove cars there don’t have drivers’ licenses. The common practice of using fake names has been disrupted by this new procedure. Hopefully, these cheaters will simply go away.

Since the City of Maricopa needs money, they might consider running a high profile traffic enforcement campaign on Monday mornings along Honeycutt Rd. There’s a potential "gold mine" here.

I was surprised at how many people all of a sudden could not prove who they were. One man didn’t even know his own address. Honestly, I think he was full of male bovine fecal material. Nobody can tell me that they don’t know their own address and not come off as a liar.

I have come to the conclusion that many people that come to this food bank are in no way, shape or form needy. They are simply “working the system”. Some of the “regulars” are capable of supporting illicit drug habits. Others are alcoholics. A majority of them can afford tobacco products. Almost all of them can afford to yak on cell phones or send text messages while waiting for their food. A very large number of people can also afford enough gasoline to make two trips to the food bank. One trip to sign up and a return trip to collect their food donation. It would probably be cheaper to make one trip to the grocery store to buy food.

I am in full support of some legislators’ proposals that people who can afford to use illegal drugs, alcohol and tobacco should be cut off from public assistance. We should drug test those that receive benefits. Those that fail should be denied any further assistance. Period!

As taxpayers, we need to insist that our elected representatives make it a point to stop supporting, aiding and enabling criminals!

“Oh what a tangled web we weave, When first we practice to deceive” --Sir Walter Scott